Sky reflecting in a monastery window | Tengboche, Nepal
General Travel, TravelShus Appreciates

Appreciating Doors and Windows

One of my favorite things to photograph while traveling are doors and windows. Not only are they unique across various cultures, climates, and architectural styles, but for me they represent the possibility and mystery that are an inherent parts of travel.

Fort Greene brownstone stoop

I’m a bit of a voyeur when it comes to windows and doors. Not creepily though, duh. But one of my favorite NYC activities is looking at apartment windows as I drive or walk down a street. What does it look like inside? Who lives there? What are they doing? This gets even more interesting when you walk up and down the streets of brownstone Brooklyn where garden level (read street level) apartment windows are common. (I realize this is ironic as I myself just recently moved into a garden level apartment)

This is magnified when I travel as I am not accustomed to local lifestyle and habits. Not only do I ask the above questions when walking down a street where windows are open and lights glow inside mysterious buildings, but even more questions bubble up in my quest to understand the lives that are lived behind the glass. What do they cook? What is in their closet? Who built this building? What is a bedtime routine in this country?

Aside from the philosophical reasons I’m drawn to them, windows and doors are fun to photograph. Windows reflect imagery and light, doors can be painstakingly crafted – occasionally intricately carved or thoughtfully adorned with tiles and mirrors. Sometimes they don’t make any sense from a structural or functional perspective which makes them even more intriguing. (Doors to nowhere-in-particular are my utmost favorites)

Let’s start with one of my favorites: a door to seemingly nowhere in Santorini, Greece.

Doorway to the sea: Santorini, Greece

Thai Royal Palace doorway, Bangkok, Thailand

Thai Royal Palace doorway, Bangkok, Thailand

Reflections on a Buddhist temple, Nepal

Doorway in the Tulum ruins, Mexico

Doorway in the Tulum ruins, Mexico

Villa Ocampo, San Isidro, Argentina

Villa Ocampo, San Isidro, Argentina

Banteay Srei temple, Cambodia

Banteay Srei temple, Cambodia

Newari door and window, Nepal

Newari door and window, Nepal

Balinese temple doorway, Nusa Lembongan, Bali

Balinese temple doorway, Nusa Lembongan, Bali

Mykonos Doorway, Greece

doorway in Mykonos, Greece

Angkor Wat doors and windows, Cambodia

Angkor Wat doors and windows, Cambodia

Valparaiso, Chile: graffiti doorway

Valparaiso, Chile: graffiti doorway

Window with a Himalayan view, Nepal

Window with a Himalayan view, Nepal

La Boca wrought iron, Buenos Aires

La Boca wrought iron, Buenos Aires

Private Doorway at the Jeeva Klui Resort in Lombok, Indonesia

Private Doorway at the Jeeva Klui Resort in Lombok, Indonesia

Ornate Thai window, Chiang Mai, Thailand

Ornate Thai window, Chiang Mai, Thailand

7-11 Thailand

7-11 Thailand

And speaking of Thailand! It’s virtually impossible to travel for any period of time throughout the country and not come into contact (or at bare minimum not hear the ding of the bell when the door glides open and the air conditioning spills out) of this ubiquitous establishment.

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7 Comments

  • Reply Margyle August 22, 2012 at 11:27 am

    Wow… just found your site. Really like this article… I also have a thing for doors and windows – that red door in Mykonos is something else!

    • Reply annie August 22, 2012 at 5:28 pm

      Such a minor detail in our everyday lives that really stands out when traveling, right?

  • Reply Margaret September 5, 2012 at 4:37 pm

    These are wonderful! (I also like taking photos of architectural details).

    • Reply annie September 7, 2012 at 1:32 pm

      Thanks. So many neat angles to photograph from. And, they dont move so you can take your time. :)

  • Reply Charu September 18, 2012 at 1:18 pm

    Absolutely loved this post and perspective! When I was a kid in school I photographed doors in NYC–LOVED the experience. Nice shots!

    • Reply annie September 18, 2012 at 5:07 pm

      thank you!

  • Reply Lynne Valenciano January 25, 2014 at 8:48 pm

    You know what, I share the same fascination. I’m especially into wooden doors and windows with intricate carvings. :)
    http://palamutishop.com

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